The Pursuit of Harmony

THE FUTURE OF MUSIC – DAVID KUSEK / GERD LEONHARD Loader

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THE FUTURE OF MUSIC – DAVID KUSEK / GERD LEONHARD

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Description

For the next generation of players and downloaders, a provocative scenario from a music industry think tank. From the Music Research Institute at Berklee College of Music comes a manifesto for the ongoing music revolution. Today, the record companies may be hurting but the music-making business is booming, using non-traditional digital methods and distribution models.

This book explains why we got where we are and where we are heading. For the iPod, downloading market, this book will explain new ways of discovering music, new ways of acquiring it and how technology trends will make music "flow like water," benefiting the people who love music and make music.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Berklee Press; Softcover edition (Jan. 1 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0876390599
  • ISBN-13: 978-0876390597
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 259 g

    From Publishers Weekly

    In what could be one of the most provocative music books published this year, two innovators in music technology take a fascinating look at the impact of the digital revolution on the music business and predict "a future in which music will be like water: ubiquitous and free-flowing." Kusek and Leonhard foresee the disappearance of CDs and record stores as we know them in the next decade; consumers will have access to more products than ever, though, through a vast range of digital radio channels, person-to-person Internet file sharing and a host of subscription services. The authors are especially good at describing how the way current record companies operate - as both owners and distributors of music, with artists making less than executives - will also drastically change: individual CD sales, for example, will be replaced by "a very potent 'liquid' pricing system that incorporates subscriptions, bundles of various media types, multi-access deals, and added-value services." While the authors often shift from analysts into cheerleaders for the über-wired future they predict - "Let's replace inefficient content-protection schemes with effective means of sharing-control and superdistribution!" - their clearly written and groundbreaking book is the first major statement of what may be "the new digital reality" of the music business in the future.